Creating Learning and Teaching Resources: A Guide for Departments of Education and Non-Government Administering Bodies

Creating Learning and Teaching Resources: A Guide for Departments of Education and Non-Government Administering Bodies

Curriculum developers are making online learning materials widely available within and across sectors and jurisdictions. In order to make content easily accessible to students and parents, they are:

(i) using existing resources and

(ii) creating new resources,

and they are making them available on either:

(i) public websites/social media platforms or

(ii) password protected intranets.

This guide provides information to State/Territory Departments of Education (‘Departments’) and non-government administering bodies such as a Catholic Diocese/Education Office or Association of Independent Schools (‘Administering Bodies’), about the copyright implications of making content available on password protected intranets or public websites/social media platforms.

Quick Tips:

  • Use material created by the Department/Administering Body.
  • License your own material under Creative Commons.
  • When using material created by others, use Creative Commons licensed material or obtain permission.
  • Link to material created by others to avoid copying it.
  • If you must rely on the educational use copyright provisions, only make the material available on a password protected intranet.
  • Apply copyright notices and properly attribute each resource.

PART A – Uploading existing material to a public website or password protected intranet

1. Public websites

Departments/Administering Bodies are choosing to make teaching material available on public websites/social media platforms, which anyone, anywhere in the world can access. Your Department/Administering Body should only do this if it owns the copyright in (ie it has created the content or the creator has assigned copyright to the Department/Administering Body), or has permission to use, every item of material in the resources that it chooses to upload to those sites. You cannot rely on the statutory licences or educational use copyright exceptions in the Copyright Act to upload content to public websites/social media platforms.

1.1 What you can upload

The only material you can upload to a public website is material:

(i) the copyright in which is owned by the Department/Administering Body
(ii) created by others (also known as ‘third party material’), which has been licensed under Creative Commons
(iii) created by others, which you have express permission to use.

Alternatively, it is okay to provide links to material created by others on public websites rather than uploading the material (see 1.1.4 below), or if you are only using an insubstantial amount of material this may also be permissible (see 1.1.5 below).

1.1.1 The Department/Administering Body’s own material

Where possible, use the Department’s or Administering Body’s own material. The Department/Administering Body owns copyright in all material created by its employees pursuant to the terms of their employment. As long as the material doesn’t include any material created by someone who is not an employee of the Department/Administering Body), then the Department/ Administering Body can use the material in any way it wants.

You should make your resources available under a Creative Commons BY Licence to ensure that it is able to be used freely by teachers, parents and students. This is consistent with the Intellectual Property policies of all Australian governments. It is great to see that so many Departments/Administering Bodies are licensing their own content under Creative Commons. It is a simple process to license your content under Creative Commons; you just need to include the Creative Commons notice on each individual resource.

You should not rely on the terms of use of your website when it comes to making resources available under Creative Commons, because it is important that if a resource is downloaded or printed, the Creative Commons notice is visible on the resource itself. Including or embedding the Creative Commons notice in resources also enables educators to find your resources when they search for Creative Commons licensed material. For information on how to properly attribute your own material see Part C of this guide.

1.1.2 Creative Commons licensed material

If third party material has been licensed under Creative Commons, it is free to use on a public website (subject to the terms and conditions of the particular Creative Commons licence). You will know if it licensed under Creative Commons because it will carry the Creative Licence logo, eg:

Attribution 2.0 Australia (CC BY 2.0 AU)

1.1.3 Where you have permission

You can use teaching resources created by others if the copyright owner has either assigned copyright to the Department/Administering Body or given permission to the Department/Administering Body to use it. You will need to check the terms of permission for each item to make sure it allows you to use it in the way you intend. You can only make it available on a public website, if the permission you have been granted allows it.

If you don’t have permission to use the material in the way you intend, you may be able to obtain permission from the copyright owner, although we are aware that may be difficult in this current environment, particularly given the time constraints. See Attachment A for sample permission requests.

1.1.4 Link

Providing links or embedding links, is a great way for curriculum developers to direct teachers, students or their parents to content created by others. You are providing a path to the location of the content, and this is not a copyright activity. If you want to include a YouTube video, for example, consider including a link to the video on YouTube. If you want to use an ABC Education resource, link to the relevant resource on the ABC Education website.

You may also consider referring students to other free resources that they may want to access from home. Many resources are being offered to students for free at this time. See Other free resources for parents supporting students at home in Useful Creative Commons and Other Free Educational Resources.

1.1.5 Insubstantial copying

When you are using insubstantial amounts of third party material, you may be able to use them without needing to rely on the statutory licences or obtaining permission from the copyright owner. What is considered ‘insubstantial’ will vary depending on the circumstances. A few lines of a book will probably be okay. A few lines of an iconic song may not be. When in doubt, we recommend that you assume that it is not insubstantial, particularly when uploading to a public website. For information on using quotes and extracts, see Quotes and Extracts.

1.2 What you should not upload

If your resource includes material created by others, you cannot upload it to a public website/social media platform unless it has been licensed under Creative Commons or the copyright owner has given you express permission to use it on a public website.

Examples of the types of material that might be embedded in your resource are illustrations, poems, photographs, YouTube videos or music sound recordings. You need to look at the terms of use of each item to check if you are permitted to make it available on a public website.

If there are items not licensed under Creative Commons, for which you don’t have permission or of which you don’t know the source, you should remove the third party material and replace it with an item that is owned by the Department/Administering Body or licensed under Creative Commons.

2. Password protected intranets

If there  is third party material embedded in your resource (which are not licensed under Creative Commons and for which you don’t have permission), you may be able to rely on the statutory licences or the educational use copyright exceptions that exist under the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth) to upload it to a password protected intranet, where this is done for the educational purposes of an educational institution or for the purpose of giving educational instruction. As noted above, these licences/exceptions do not apply to the use of material on public websites.

So, for example, if there are photographs, illustrations, song lyrics, clips from YouTube videos or extracts from free-to-air television broadcasts, these may be okay to include on a password protected intranet. In each case, you need to ensure that you are complying with the conditions of the statutory licences or exceptions. For more information, see Educational Licences and Flexible Dealing.

Note that the schools music licences do not extend to Departments/Administering Bodies using sound recordings or musical works on behalf of their schools, so you cannot rely these licences to include sound recordings or musical works.

You should be aware that reliance by curriculum developers on the statutory licences for curriculum materials has significant cost implications for the schools sector. It is always better, where possible, to use content owned by the Department/Administering Body or licensed under Creative Commons.

PART B – Creating new material to upload to a public website or password protected intranet

3. Public websites

3.1.1 Only use your own material

If you are creating new resources, you should, where possible, use the Department or Administering Body’s own material. As long as the material doesn’t include any material created by someone who is not an employee of the Department/Administering Body, then you can upload it to a public website.

You should make your resources available under a Creative Commons BY Licence to ensure that it is able to be used freely by teachers, parents and students. It is a simple process to license your content under Creative Commons; you just need to include the Creative Commons notice on each individual resource.

You should not rely on the terms of use of your website when it comes to making resources available under Creative Commons, because it is important that if a resource is downloaded or printed, the Creative Commons notice is visible on the resource itself. Including or embedding the Creative Commons notice in resources also enables educators to find your resources when they search for Creative Commons licensed material. For information on how to properly attribute your own material see Part C of this guide.

3.1.2 Creative Commons licensed material

We encourage curriculum developers to use Creative Commons licensed material, which is free to access, modify and share.

If, for example, you are using clip art, try to use openly licensed clip art – such as from the Open Clip Art Library at CLKER.com.

Instead of using stock photos, use one of the 300 million Creative Commons licensed images on Flickr.com.

See How to Find Creative Commons Licensed Material and Useful Creative Commons and Other Free Educational Resources.

3.1.3 Obtain permission

Where you are not using your own or Creative Commons licensed material, you should obtain permission from the copyright owner of material you want to use. If you want to make it available on a public website, you need to make sure that the permission you obtain allows you to do that. See Attachment A for sample permission requests.

3.1.4 Link or embed

Providing links or embedding links to material is a great way for curriculum developers to direct teachers, students or their parents to content. By including a link you are providing a path to the material’s location, and this is not a copyright activity. If you want to include a YouTube video, for example, consider including a link to the video. If you want to use an ABC Education resource, link to the relevant resource on the ABC Education website.

3.1.5 Use as inspiration

If you find useful material that has been created by others, use it as inspiration for you to create your own original content, but please do not copy the material in any way (including its form and layout).

3.1.6 Insubstantial copying

When you are using insubstantial amounts of third party material in new material that you are creating, you may be able to use them without needing to rely on the statutory licences or obtaining permission from the copyright owner. What is considered ‘insubstantial’ will vary depending on the circumstances. A few lines of a book will probably be okay. A few lines of an iconic song may not be. When in doubt, we recommend that you assume that it is not insubstantial. For information on using quotes and extracts, see Quotes and Extracts.

4. Password Protected Intranets

If you are including third party material (which are not licensed under Creative Commons and for which you don’t have permission) in your resource, you may be able to rely on the statutory licences or the educational use copyright exceptions to upload it to a password protected intranet. You need to ensure that you comply with the conditions of the statutory licences or copyright exceptions.

If you choose to rely on the statutory licences or the educational use copyright exceptions, you can never make that material available on a public website.

You should be aware that reliance by curriculum developers on the statutory licences for curriculum materials has significant cost implications for the schools sector. It is always better to create your own content or use material licensed under Creative Commons.

PART C – Attribution and copyright notices

5. Attribution and copyright notices

You should always:

(i) attribute each individual resource, and where possible, each individual page or element of a resource and
(ii) include an appropriate copyright notice on the home page of the website or intranet.

When you are creating new resources, you should follow best practice attribution and license all Department/Administering Body owned material under Creative Commons.

For examples of best practice attribution/copyright notices see Attachment B.

5.1 Attribution

How you attribute the material will depend on what the material is (ie text, video or music) and the basis on which you are able to use it (eg owned by the Department/Administering Body, you have obtained permission from the copyright owner, it is licensed under Creative Commons or you are relying on a statutory licence).

All material created and used for educational purposes should be properly attributed. Attribution is important to ensure we don’t pay licence fees for material we already own or are allowed to use such as Department/Administering Body created content. It makes it clear to the users of the content how they can use it.

If you are using Creative Commons licensed material in your resources, best practice attribution is TASL:

(i) Title
(ii) Author/Copyright Owner
(iii) Source
(iv) Licence

5.2 Material Owned by the Department/Administering Body

Include a Creative Commons BY Licence notice on each resource that is owned by the Department/Administering Body. For text or artistic works, the Creative Commons notice should appear in the footer of each page of the resource. For videos, include within the video or, if you are uploading your resource to YouTube, you can mark your video with a Creative Commons BY licence (eg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tmwZUs_JXE). Note that the YouTube dropdown menu only allows you to select the CC BY Licence. If you want to apply a more restrictive licence, you will need to include it in the resource itself and/or the product description. An alternative is to use Vimeo, which allows you to apply the full suite of licences.

You can still license your own material under Creative Commons, even if it includes material created by others. However, you will need to apply the correct copyright notice as the Creative Commons Licence will not apply to third party material in your resource.

See our information sheets How to Label Third Party Content in Creative Commons Licensed Material, Recommended Creative Commons Website and Publication Notices and Applying a Creative Commons Licence.

5.3 Attributing material when relying on the educational use provisions

If you are relying on the educational use provisions to use material created by others, you should, wherever possible, include a label containing sufficient information to identify the copyright owner. For example, include the name of the author, title, publisher, edition or date of publication, and ISBN or ISSN. If you are copying from a website, you should include the full URL. It’s not enough to include just the name of the author (the author is often different from the copyright owner).

If you are copying broadcasts, include the name of the program, the channel it was copied from and the date the copy was made.

There is no statutory obligation to include a notice stating that copyright material has been copied/communicated in reliance on the educational use provisions. However, it is still good practice, where it is reasonably practicable, to include the following notice on materials that have been copied under the educational use provisions:

This material has been copied and communicated to you in accordance with the educational use provisions of the Copyright Act. Any further reproduction or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act. Do not remove this notice [insert date material has been copied and made available to students].

6. Further Information

If you have questions or need guidance, please contact the National Copyright Unit:
Tel: 02 7814 3855
Email: smartcopying@det.nsw.edu.au
www.smartcopying.edu.au

Attachment A

Sample Permission Requests

1. Sample email requesting permission (if verbal permission provided)

Example of wording to be sent as an email:

Dear [name of copyright owner],

Thank you for speaking with me and agreeing to provide permission for [insert [department/administering body] to use, reproduce, [publicly perform – if a musical work or sound recording] and communicate [name or description of work(s)] (‘Works(s)’) for [insert intended use] (‘Purpose’).

So that we have it in writing, will you please confirm via reply email that you own all of the intellectual property rights in the Work(s) and that you grant [insert department/administering body] a non-exclusive, royalty free, perpetual licence to use, reproduce, [publicly perform – if a musical work or sound recording] and communicate the Work(s) for the Purpose. Please also tell us how you would like to be attributed as author of the Work(s).

Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me on [contact details].

Thank you again for your assistance.

Kind Regards,

[Name
Title]

2. Sample email requesting permission (if no prior contact)

Example of wording to be sent as an email:

Dear [name of copyright owner],

I am writing on behalf of the [insert department/administering body] to request permission to use, reproduce [publicly perform – if a musical work or sound recording] and communicate [name or description of work(s)] (‘Work(s)’) for [insert intended use] (‘Purpose’).

Will you please confirm via reply email that you own all of the intellectual property rights in the Work(s) and that you grant [insert department/administering body] a non-exclusive, royalty free, perpetual licence to use, reproduce, [publicly perform – if a musical work or sound recording] and communicate the Work(s) for the Purpose. Please also tell us how you would like to be attributed as author of the Work(s).

If you are not the rights holder of the Work(s), we would appreciate it if you would provide us with any contact information you have about the rights holder.

If you require any additional information regarding this request, please contact [name and unit] on [insert phone number] or [insert email address]. If you require further information regarding copyright, please contact the National Copyright Unit on 02 7814 3855 or smartcopying@det.nsw.edu.au.

Kind Regards,

[Name
Title]

3. Sample letter to request permission

[NAME
TITLE
ORGANISATION
ADDRESS]

[DATE]

Dear [TITLE AND SURNAME]

[NAME OR DESCRIPTION OF WORK]

I am writing on behalf of the [department/administering body] to request permission to use, reproduce, [perform – if a musical work or sound recording] and communicate the work, [NAME OR DESCRIPTION OF WORK] (“Work”) for inclusion in the following publication:

[INSERT INTENDED USES, INCLUDING WHETHER THE WORK WILL BE PASSWORD PROTECTED]

(“Publication”)

If you agree to grant the requested permission, please complete and sign the attached form and return a copy to [NAME AND UNIT] at the following email address [INSERT EMAIL ADDRESS].

If you are not the rights holder of the Work, we would appreciate it if you would provide us with any contact information you have about the rights holder.

If you require any additional information regarding this request please contact [NAME AND UNIT] on [INSERT PHONE NUMBER] or [INSERT EMAIL ADDRESS]. If you require further information regarding copyright, please contact the National Copyright Unit: 02 7814 3855 or smartcopying@det.nsw.edu.au.

Yours Sincerely,

[NAME
TITLE]

4. Sample permission request form

Work [INSERT NAME OR DESCRIPTION OF WORK]
Year the Work was created [INSERT YEAR]
Name [INSERT NAME]
Company / Organisation [INSERT COMPANY OR ORGANISATION NAME, IF APPLICABLE]
Address [INSERT ADDRESS, IF KNOWN]
Telephone Number/s [INSERT TELEPHONE NUMBERS, IF KNOWN]
Email address [INSERT EMAIL ADDRESS, IF KNOWN]

Please indicate the permission granted by ticking the appropriate box.

I confirm that I own all intellectual property rights in the Work, and I grant the following rights to [department/administering body] on a royalty free basis for the full term of the Work’s copyright:

I authorise the [department/administering body] to use, reproduce, [perform – if a musical work or sound recording] and communicate the Work for the purposes of [EDUCATIONAL BODY].

I authorise the [department/administering body] to use, reproduce, [perform – if a musical work or sound recording] and communicate the Work for the following purposes only: [INSERT PURPOSES]

Please credit me as follows:_________________________________________

I do not authorise the [department/administering body] to use, reproduce, [perform – if a musical work or sound recording] or communicate the Work.

I do not own the intellectual property rights in the Work. The contact details of the rights holder are as follows:

 

Information contained on this form has been collected in order to administer educational programs for students in the [department/administering body’s] schools. Any personal information will be stored, used and disclosed in accordance with the requirements of the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth).

Signature: _________________________________________
Date:_________

Attachment B

Examples of Copyright Notices/Attribution

1. Sample Australian State and Territory Departments of Education website copyright notices

Long-form:

Copyright and Terms of Use
© [insert name of government and department] (unless indicated otherwise), 2020

The copyright material published on this website is subject to the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth), and is owned by [insert name of government and department] or, where indicated, by a party other than [insert name of government and department].

[insert name of government and department] supports and encourages use of its material for all legitimate purposes.

Copyright material available on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) licence unless indicated otherwise [Excluded Material].

Attribution 2.0 Australia (CC BY 2.0 AU)

Except in relation to Excluded Material this licence allows you to:

• share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and
• adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material,

for any purpose, even commercially provided you attribute [insert name of government and department] as the source of the copyright material. The [insert name of government and department] requests attribution as: [insert attribution information].

Website material not available under a Creative Commons licence:

The [insert name of government and department] logo, other logos, the Coat of Arms of Australia and trade mark protected material are not licensed under a CC BY licence and may not be used.

Excluded Material on this website may not be licensed under a CC BY licence and can only be used in accordance with the specific terms of use attached to that material. If you want to use such material in a manner that is not covered by those specific terms of use, you must request permission from the copyright owner of the material.

Linked material available on third party websites:

If you use the links provided on this website to access a third party’s website, you acknowledge that the terms of use, including licence terms, set out on the third party’s website apply to the use which may be made of the materials on that third party’s website.

If this website contains links to your website and you have any objection to such link, please contact [insert name of government and department].
If you have any questions regarding use of material available on this website, please contact us [insert contact information].

Short-form:

Copyright and Terms of Use
© [insert name of government and department] (unless indicated otherwise), 2020

The [insert name of government and department] supports and encourages the dissemination and exchange of publicly funded information, and endorses the use of the Australian Governments Open Access and Licensing Framework by its agencies.

Subject to the exceptions listed below, the material available on this website is owned by [insert name of government and department] and is protected by Crown Copyright. It is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. The legal code for the licence is available here.

Attribution 2.0 Australia (CC BY 2.0 AU)

The Department requests attribution as: [insert attribution information].

Exceptions:

The Creative Commons licence does not apply to:

1. the [insert name of government and department] logo
2. the Coat of Arms of Australia or a State or Territory of Australia and
3. material owned by third parties that has been reproduced with permission. Permission will need to be obtained from third parties to re-use their material.

If you have questions about the copyright in the content of this website, please contact: [insert contact information].

2. Sample Independent Schools and Catholic Schools website copyright notices

Long-form:

Copyright and Terms of Use
© [insert name of association] (unless indicated otherwise), 2020

The copyright material published on this website is subject to the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth), and is owned by [insert name of association] or, where indicated, by a party other than [insert name of association].
[insert name of association] supports and encourages use of its material for all legitimate purposes.

Copyright material available on this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence unless indicated otherwise [Excluded Material].

Attribution 2.0 Australia (CC BY 2.0 AU)

Except in relation to Excluded Material this licence allows you to:
• share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and
• adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material,
for any purpose, even commercially provided you attribute [insert name of association] as the source of the copyright material. The [insert name of association] requests attribution as: [insert attribution information].

Website material not available under a Creative Commons licence:

The [insert name of association] logo, other logos and trade mark protected material are not licensed under a CC BY licence and may not be used.

Excluded Material on this website may not be licensed under a CC BY licence and can only be used in accordance with the specific terms of use attached to that material. If you want to use such material in a manner that is not covered by those specific terms of use, you must request permission from the copyright owner of the material.

Linked material available on third party websites:

If you use the links provided on this website to access a third party’s website, you acknowledge and agree that the terms of use, including licence terms, set out on the third party’s website apply to the use which may be made of the materials on that third party’s website.

If this website contains links to your website and you have any objection to such link, please contact [insert name of association].

If you have any questions regarding use of material available on this website, please contact us [insert contact information].

Short-form:

Copyright and Terms of Use
© [insert name of association] (unless indicated otherwise), 2020
[insert name of association] supports and encourages use of its material for all legitimate purposes.

Subject to the exceptions listed below, the material available on this website is owned by [insert name of association] and is subject to the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). It is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. The legal code for the licence is available here.

Attribution 2.0 Australia (CC BY 2.0 AU)

The [insert name of association] requests attribution as: [insert attribution information].

Exceptions:

The Creative Commons licence does not apply to:

1. the [insert name of association] logo or trademarks and
2. material owned by third parties that has been reproduced with permission. Permission will need to be obtained from third parties to re-use their material.

If you have questions about the copyright in the content of this website, please contact: [insert contact information].

3. Links to current departmental copyright notices

Department of Education, NSW
Department of Education, Queensland
Department of Education and Training, Victoria
Department of Education, WA
Department of Education, Queensland
Department for Education, SA
Department of Education, Tas
ACT Education Directorate
Department of Education, NT

4. Best practice attribution of material created by the Department/Administering Body

Material that has been created by you, your school or an educational body should be clearly labelled in order to avoid the possibility of the sector having to pay under the statutory licences to use the content. This is best done with a footer on each page. For example:

© NSW Department of Education, 2020 Attribution 2.0 Australia (CC BY 2.0 AU)

© Catholic Education Office of WA 2020 Attribution 2.0 Australia (CC BY 2.0 AU)

These are good examples of attribution:

Text:

Individual Pathway Planning (Department of Education WA) (pdf)

Talking about sensitive topics with your child and the school (pdf)

Video:

Connecting with Community – NSW Community Languages Schools Program (YouTube)

Teaching remote FAQ – Doomadgee State School, Queensland (YouTube)

5. Best practice attribution of third party material contained in resources owned by the Department/Administering Body or licensed under Creative Commons

You must ensure that any third party content that is not owned or Creative Commons licensed is clearly identified as such. This can be done either by including a notice directly under the third party content, or by giving a general notice that includes all third party, non-Creative Commons licensed content. For example:

‘P,Taylor, 2020,‘Native Plants of WA’, © Insite Publishers, All Rights Reserved, Used with permission.’

or

‘All material on this website, except as identified below, is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.’

Material that is not licensed under a Creative Commons licence is:

• Photographs on pages 4-6
• Poem on page 2
• Video footage

You must request permission from the copyright owner to use any of the material not licensed under Creative Commons.

6. Best practice attribution if you have permission to use a third party work

Reproduced and made available for copying and communication by [insert name of Department/Administering Body] for [its] educational purposes with the permission of [name copyright owner].

7. Best practice attribution if you have relied on the educational use provisions to use a third party work

We recommend that you include the following notice if you have relied on the educational use provisions to use third party works, such as text, artworks, television broadcasts or video:

This material has been copied and communicated to you in accordance with the educational use provisions of the Copyright Act. Any further reproduction or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act. Do not remove this notice [insert date material has been copied and made available to students].

If you have relied on the Statutory Text and Artistic Works Licence to copy a text work, artistic work or television broadcast, a practical way of including this notice to electronic material is to insert a link to the notice from the attribution information, eg:

Copied under the statutory licence in s 113P of the Copyright Act
Stateless, ABC, 1 March 2020
[Link to warning notice]

This would mean that the notice would have to be uploaded onto one spot on the repository and be linked to when required.

Where it is not possible to include a link to the notice from the attribution information, the notice could be displayed (flashed) on the screen as the user logs into the password protected intranet. If using this approach, you should modify the notice to make it clear that it applies to only some of the material on the repository:

Some of this material has been copied and communicated to you in accordance with the educational use provisions of the Copyright Act. Any further reproduction or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act. Do not remove this notice [insert date material has been copied and made available to students].

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