home ›› copyright guidelines ›› Copyright - a general overview ›› 1.11 Statutory and Voluntary Licences

1.11 Statutory and Voluntary Licences

| Back to Table of Contents |

There are also some Statutory and Voluntary Licences available to schools and TAFE institutes.

The Statutory and Voluntary Licences are administered by collecting societies on behalf of copyright owners.

There are two types of collecting societies:

The main collecting societies are set out below.

  1. Statutory Licence Collecting Societies

    The following collecting societies administer the Statutory Licences .

    1. Copyright Agency Limited (CAL)

      CAL is the declared collecting society for the reproduction and communication of print and artistic works by educational institutions. CAL represents copyright owners of print and artistic works including publishers, authors and artists. CAL's main function is to administer the Statutory Text and Artistic Licence.

      Website: www.copyright.com.au

    2. Screenrights

      Screenrights (formerly the Audio-Visual Copyright Society Limited) is the declared collecting society for the copying and communication of material from radio and television broadcasts by educational institutions.

      Screenrights represents audio-visual copyright owners. Screenrights’ main function is to administer the Statutory Broadcast Licence.

      Website: www.screen.org

    Back to top

  2. Voluntary Licence Collecting Societies

    The following collecting societies administer the following licences:

    1. Australasian Performing Rights Association (APRA)

      APRA is the collecting society which collects and distributes licence fees for the public performance and communication to the public of musical works and their lyrics on behalf of its members, including composers, song writers, music publishers and other copyright owners.

      Educational institutions, on behalf of schools have a Voluntary Licence with APRA which allows schools to play live and recorded music in certain circumstances. The licence covers:

      Where the music is to be performed (live or pre-recorded) in situations not in the list above, further permission should be sought from APRA.

      There is currently no national TAFE sector licence with APRA. However, some individual TAFE institutes have their own licence with APRA.

      Website: www.apra.com.au

    2. AMCOS (Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society)

      AMCOS administers and distributes licence fees collected for 'mechanical' and 'reproduction' rights in musical works on behalf of its members, namely composers, writers and music publishers.

      A licence is required to make a recording of a musical work even if there is no intention to sell the recording. Most educational institutions have a Voluntary Licence with AMCOS which allows schools to copy sheet music.

      There is currently no national TAFE sector licence with AMCOS. However, some individual TAFE institutes have their own licence with AMCOS.

      Website: www.amcos.com.au

      Back to top

    3. PPCA (Phonographic Performance Company of Australia Limited)

      The PPCA grants licences on behalf of its members (including record companies, recording artists, and other sound recording copyright owners) to play sound recordings and show music videos in public.

      Schools and TAFE institutes do not need to have a PPCA licence to play or communicate a sound recording or show a music video in class. The PPCA administers a licence for the public performance of sound recordings.

      Website: www.ppca.com.au

    4. VISCOPY

      VISCOPY is the visual artists collecting society which distributes licence fees collected on behalf of its members under the Statutory Licence schemes.

      Website: www.viscopy.com.au

    5. Christian Copyright Licensing International (CCLI)  

      CCLI licences rights over Christian music published by its members. Schools wishing to use Christian music should contact CCLI.

      Websitewww.ccli.com.au

| Back to Table of Contents |